WEAVING HISTORY OF BORUCA.....

The art of Borucan weaving has been passed down from generation to generation for centuries. Mothers and/or grandmothers teach their daughters the traditional techiniques of this craft. For the village women, weaving is a ritual part of everyday life and is done in-between chores.For several hundreds of years, they have been weaving on back strap looms to provide their clothing and blankets for their beds (hammocks). The textiles created on this type of loom cannot be made very long or wide because the loom is tied around the waist of the weaver, while the other end is secured to a post or tree. This primitive equipment produces a narrow 18 to 22 inch fabric about the width of their bodies. Therefore, it may take two or three months to create a bedspread or blanket that must be first woven in pieces and then sewn together.

 

The patterns seen on all woven products are not kept in written record, but are handed down over the years. Every textile made by each indigenous artist is unique and is a product of traditions born deep within the history of the Boruca Indians of Costa Rica. Today in the

village school, cotton gathering and hand spinning of the yarn is taught in the second grade. In the third grade, the dyes and dying process are introduced and the fourth graders are given weaving instructions. The Borucans begin by gathering cotton grown on their land. Then they spin it into yarn by hand, which is a tedious process. Next the yarn is naturally dyed, and woven on the looms. Hense, it takes several days of work, for the final product.

Not all the members perform all the steps in the process, but they all weave. There are not

many sewing machines in the village, so just a few of the women sew the woven

goods into the purses, backpacks and tote bags. Weaving literally binds women

to their land, as well as their culture. The weaver is an integral part of the loom, connected

to her environment and at one with nature. A Borucan ritual today, every January most of the village weavers travel by bus to the Pacific Coast beaches of Piñuela and Ventana to collect the secretion of the Murex sea snails, which they use as one of their natural dyes, a process dating back to 200 B.C. See the tab 'Tyrian Purple' for more information about this ancient

process, and the tab 'Only Natural Dyes'.

OUR UNIQUE NATURALLY DYED HAND WOVEN PRODUCTS....

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INDIGENOUS OF COSTA RICA

ARTESANOS NATURALES DE BORUCA

EMAIL - ARTESANOSNATURALES@GMAIL.COM